Visit North Yorkshire

The Information below is that I have researched on the internet and in libraries and hopefully correct, however, I cannot guarantee it, it is easy for errors to be made. Should you find any errors, anything I might have missed or indeed anything I can include or research please email info@harrogateguide.co.uk
Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Terms and Conditions of Use by you or any third parties. If you are unable to find what you require please contact us at info@harrogateguide.co.uk. and we will try to find the nearest for you.

Visit North YorkshireVisit the website here

Business: Visit North Yorkshire

Location: North Yorkshire

Phone: E-Mail: info@visitingnorthyorkshire.com

Description :

Visit North Yorkshire

Visiting North Yorkshire North Yorkshire is the largest non-metropolitan county and lieutenancy area in England, covering an area of 8,654 square kilometres. Around 40% of the county is covered by national parks, including most of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors.

Welcome to Visiting North Yorkshire, the home of tourism in North Yorkshire. From here you can find information to help you plan your visit to our amazing County.

The geology of North Yorkshire is closely reflected in its landscape. Within the county are the North York Moors and most of the Yorkshire Dales; two of eleven areas of countryside within England and Wales to be officially designated as national parks. Between the North York Moors in the east and the Pennine Hills in the west lie the Vales of Mowbray and York. The Tees Lowlands lie to the north of the North York Moors and the Vale of Pickering lies to the south. Its eastern border is the North sea coast. The highest point is Whernside, on the Cumbrian border, at 736 metres (2,415 ft)

The two major rivers in the county are the River Swale and the River Ure. The Swale and the Ure form the River Ouse which flows through York and into the Humber Estuary. The River Tees forms part of the border between North Yorkshire and County Durham and flows from upper Teesdale through Stockton-on-Tees and Middlesbrough and to the coast. The River Wharfe forms much of the southern border and also flows into the Ouse within the county.

Click Here for easy navigation, you can find information on Accommodation, Food & Drink, What’s On, Tourist Attractions, information on Health Centres, Vets, Dentists, Car Charging Points, Gift Shops, Transport and much more besides all from the Visiting North Yorkshire site.

Visiting North Yorkshire, the home of tourism in North Yorkshire – Click Here to See the Details from the Visiting North Yorkshire site



Visit SkiptonVisit the website here

Business: Visit Skipton

Location: Skipton

Phone: 01756 792809

Description :

Visit Skipton WELCOME TO SKIPTON

What’s not to love about Skipton? Immense history, a rich culture, independent shops, food & drink places galore, a famous market an iconic castle, stunning countryside and, perhaps most of all, friendly, fiercely proud and passionate Yorkshire people.

We love our town, and it’s important to us that you love it too. So here is our guide to Skipton, to help you get the most out of your visit. It’s where we share our favourite things, places you shouldn’t miss, a few tucked-away secrets and some local goings-on. 

Who knows, after you’ve visited a couple of times, you may want to join our community permanently and move here? That would be just grand. 

You can find out more at Skipton Tourist Information Centre in the Town Hall, tel: 01756 792809

Click Links Below

 

The name Skipton means 'sheep-town', a northern dialect form of Shipton. The name is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. It was important during the English Civil War and was the site of prisoner of war camps during the First and Second World Wars.

Skipton Castle was built in 1090 as a wooden motte-and-bailey by Robert de Romille, a Norman baron. In the 12th century William le Gros strengthened it with a stone keep to repel attacks from the Kingdom of Scotland to the north the castle elevated Skipton from a poor dependent village to a burgh administered by a reeve. The protection offered by Skipton Castle during the Middle Ages encouraged the urbanisation of the surrounding area, and during times of war and disorder the town attracted an influx of families. It is now one of the most complete and best preserved medieval castles in England and is open to the public.

One of the oldest mills in North Yorkshire, High Corn Mill is powered by the waters of Eller Beck, and dates to 1310 when it was owned by Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford; at that point it was transferred to the powerful Clifford family by the then King Edward II The mill as it appears today is only half of what used to exist when two mills were in operation to produce corn for the whole of Skipton. The mill has been completely redesigned, from the mill grounds to the buildings themselves. The outside walls of the mill have been sandblasted and the two main buildings of the old mill have been turned into flats from 2007 onwards, with one stand-alone building yet to be redesigned, touched or sandblasted.

Skipton became a prosperous market town, trading sheep and woollen goods: its name derives from the Old English sceap (sheep) and tun (town or village). A market stemming from its formative years still survives. In the 19th century, Skipton emerged as a small mill town connected to the major cities by the Leeds and Liverpool Canal and its branch Thanet Canal, (known locally as 'Springs branch canal'), but during the 20th century Skipton's economy shifted to tourism, aided by its historic architecture and proximity to the Yorkshire Dales. Since 1974, Skipton has been the seat of Craven District Council. The Skipton Building Society was founded in the town. In 2016 Skipton was voted the best place to live in England for the second time, having been voted for by the Sunday Times, two years earlier.